January Hempcrete News Roundup

January Hempcrete News Roundup

 

1. London-based firm Practice Architecture collaborated with local hemp farmers in Cambridgeshire to build a zero-carbon home built using hemp grown on-site. Hemp continues its push to become the frontrunner of green and sustainable materials used by innovative designers and architects.

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2. Hempcrete’s properties are passive; the material is not alive. But Wil Srubar, an assistant professor in the Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering at Colorado University Boulder, has been wondering: If we used building materials that are still alive, could we yield additional benefits from them? To date, the answer is “yes.”

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3. The NY Times offers an in-depth look at the growing demand of the sustainable housing market with the use of cannabis for building material. The article also points out that although hempcrete is an emerging trend, it has been around since the 6th century when a hemp mortar bridge was constructed in France (when it was still Gaul). Additionally, the article covers challenges with building codes and standards.

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4. Indian startup Gohemp Agroventures won this year’s Entrepreneur Rewards competition at the annual Asian Hemp Summit. The company’s mission is to contribute to India’s goal of providing houses to 11.2 million Indian families by 2022. The founders formed the company as a response to the growing threat to Indian cities and villages due to polluting construction practices and the conventional built environment. They aim to bridge the gap between architecture and agriculture by promoting plant based building materials while contributing to the economic welfare of Indian farmers.

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5. The Philadelphia Inquirer covers the weeklong Pennsylvania Farm Show, where many exhibitors focused on hemp’s manufacturing potentials. Last year, Pennsylvania farmers cultivated 4,000 acres of industrial hemp. One of the state’s top evangelists, Geoff Whaling, showed up with his BMW in which 14% of the car was comprised of hemp.

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